Author Topic: Basics - Loglines  (Read 1183 times)

Writer Arena

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Basics - Loglines
« on: August 21, 2013, 09:54:14 PM »
This is a thread containing information related to writing log lines.

Alex

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Re: Basics - Loglines
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2013, 11:29:11 AM »
Loglines are the first impression that a reader or would be producer gets of your screenplay and usually makes them decide whether they want to read further.
So is this IMPORTANT, shit yes.

The loglines have to be well written with no typos or spelling mistakes and have to flow easily of the top of your tongue.

It also has to contain enough information to interest and excite the reader to want to continue.

Loglines are not a detailed outline of your story, as you really want to leave some mystery so the reader wants to know more.

There are a number of sites dedicated to loglines and many writers feel they need to perfect this critical part more so than other areas of their writing, though all are just as important as each other.

Regards Alex
« Last Edit: August 22, 2013, 11:31:49 AM by Alex »
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Writer Arena

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Re: Basics - Loglines
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2013, 01:24:07 PM »
I have no idea if this is true or not but how I understand log lines originated was that the studios kept their scripts in a large library. When a script was brought in it was entered into a large ledger or log that had a small amount of space to enter a description of the script.  This short description was the log line for the script, a mini synopsis.

Today people seem to use log lines for two different reasons one is to describe the script for potential readers (which is sort of its original use) and the other is to pitch the script.  These two types log lines are different.  So when you're creating your log line you should keep in mind which of these two uses it is for.   And whatever you do, don't confuse the log line with the tag line which is the sort of enticing blurb you might see on a DVD cover.   

A log line should tell a story, how much of the story is the difference between a pitch and a mini-synopsis.     
« Last Edit: August 22, 2013, 02:42:15 PM by Writer Arena »

Alex

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Re: Basics - Loglines
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2013, 11:40:21 AM »
I have no idea if this is true or not but how I understand log lines originated was that the studios kept their scripts in a large library. When a script was brought in it was entered into a large ledger or log that had a small amount of space to enter a description of the script.  This short description was the log line for the script, a mini synopsis.

Today people seem to use log lines for two different reasons one is to describe the script for potential readers (which is sort of its original use) and the other is to pitch the script.  These two types log lines are different.  So when you're creating your log line you should keep in mind which of these two uses it is for.   And whatever you do, don't confuse the log line with the tag line which is the sort of enticing blurb you might see on a DVD cover.   

A log line should tell a story, how much of the story is the difference between a pitch and a mini-synopsis.     

Hey Michael, some interesting information here so I goggled it and found.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Log_line

Read the part under "history" -- Very interesting.

Alex
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Writer Arena

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Re: Basics - Loglines
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2013, 10:48:41 AM »
Hey Alex, thanks for Wikiing. I have no idea if that's true either but it was close to what I read.  To me, having them in a log sounds a bit more like how the term originated, however.  Otherwise it would be called spineline or something like that. 

Anyway, more on log lines.  Did you know you could writer a formula that describes a pitch-type logline?  It's (Who*2)+What+Irony. 

So you need to include the protagonist, the antagonist, what happened, and what offsets it.  The order doesn't matter.

- A woman struggles with her identity when she discovers she has a twin sister and that their names might have been switched.

protag: woman
antag: same woman
what: struggles with her identity
irony: she might not be who she thinks she is.

- Despite the possibility that she might be a killer, an undertaker searches for the woman he saw in a photo that he found on the body of his recently murdered client . 

- When his wife kicks him out, a man fights his dog to claim possession of the dog house.   


   

Alex

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Re: Basics - Loglines
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2013, 11:34:22 AM »
Hey Michael,

It does seem logical as no two screenplays would have the same title as well as the same logline so it would be a way of distinguishing between them.

Is it true? Maybe we will never know.

Alex
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It takes 15 years to be an "Overnight Success"

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It takes 15 years to be an "Overnight Success"

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